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Strategies for reopening schools internationally

According to UNESCO monitoring, 71 countries have announced the reopening of their schools. Of these, 12 have already reopened. 52, including France, have decided on a reopening date during the current school year, and 7 have postponed the reopening to the following year. 128 countries have not yet announced dates.

Why reopen schools? Which international organisations are involved? What are the differences in approaches between countries? This article provides a brief overview.

This article is part of a contributory watch, and I should point out that I am not a journalist.

If you spot an inaccuracy, or if you have additional information, please contact me, and I will add to this article. Thank you for your kindness.

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International press review on pedagogical continuity #2

Here is a second article on pedagogical continuity, as seen from several countries. The purpose here is to understand the similarities or differences regarding the reaction to the current crisis. And to start building collective intelligence around what is happening in the education world.

This international press review is part of a contributory watch, and a series of articles, that I have launched around the “pedagogical continuity” implemented in France and around the world.

The contributory table is accessible at this address. Do not hesitate to contribute, or to contact me!

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International press review on pedagogical continuity #1

For several weeks now, schools and higher education institutions have been closed in most countries of the world. UNESCO, which monitors the international situation, is keeping track of these impressive figures:

  • 1,575,270,054 affected learners
  • 91.3% of total enrolled learners
  • 191 country-wide closures

While the French President has announced the “gradual” reopening of schools from 11 May, I propose that we look back over the last few weeks of “pedagogical continuity”, with a few lessons from the world… and finally many points in common between the countries observed.

This article is part of a contributory watch, and I should point out that I am not a journalist.

If you spot an inaccuracy, or if you have additional information, please contact me, and I will add to this article. Thank you for your kindness.

Continue reading “International press review on pedagogical continuity #1”

School closing : Collaborative inventory of publications and thinkings [Feat Le Mouton Numérique]

Schools and universities are experiencing a “pedagogical continuity” entirely dependent on digital technologies. Against those who would like to use the crisis to amplify the use of their solutions, it is important to remember that the situation we are experiencing is absolutely exceptional and should not be the excuse for a revived technological solutionism. In order to continue to think about educational digital technology with distance and critical thinking, we are launching a collaborative work to collect articles and reflections on the issue.

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5 implications of the digital age that must form part of our education

I recently had the chance to give a conference in Chartres as part of the Human Tech Days series. I was a guest of the Orléans-Tours and Centre-Val de Loire region’s DANE (Academic Delegation for Digital-based Learning), who were taking advantage of the series of events dedicated to digital in order to allocate one day to education.

The title of this conference was as follows: “An overview of the digital age and of its implications for education”. You can rediscover it under Creative Commons licence on this page.

So here are the 5 implications that I set out during this conference. It is evidently a highly subjective and non-exhaustive list. It seeks to open up a debate rather than give clear answers.

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